WORLD WAR ONE NORTHAMPTON INDEPENDENT SOLDIER NEWSPAPER ARTICLES   

                                             PTE. W. A. GOODMAN of the R.A.M.C., May, 1917                               

                                An interesting account of his experiences on board the ‘Lanfrane’ one of the hospital ships

                                torpedoed in the Channel on April 17th.

 

                                    “I was in the dispensary at the time she was struck, and at once everywhere was filled with

                                smoke, and the bottles and broken glass flew in all directions.  I had my lifebelt near, and it didn’t

                                take me long to don it and make my way on deck.  I thought the ship was going at once, but after

                                a few minutes she remained steady, which no doubt saved us.  The explosion occurred just in our

                                quarters, and it is a wonder we were not there.  Had we been, I might now be flirting with a mermaid.”

 

                                    “It was an experience!  Bad enough for anyone in ordinary health, but for the maimed and wounded

                                it was hell.  But the spirit of the boys was wonderful.  Not a murmur from one, in spite of their agonies. 

                                The Huns [there were 167 wounded Germans on board in addition to 234 British] were the first to make

                                for the boats and would have been in them but for measures taken to prevent them.”

 

                                    “I was taken off by a destroyer which managed to get alongside after a time – there was a heavy sea

                                running.”

 

 

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